Posts Tagged ‘android’

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The Easiest Way to Root a Galaxy Note 10.1

27/05/2013
Unlocking your Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (Proceed with Caution)

Proceed with Caution

Rooting your device is a pretty dangerous game, even nowadays when it’s almost commonplace. You can lose your data, void your warranty or even brick your device. However, if you’re looking to really unlock the power of your Android tablet, there’s really no better way. It gives you unparalleled access to your files, ability to install apps that do some pretty amazing things, or even install your own OS aside from Android.

So, obvious warnings aside (above), I want to show you the easiest way I’ve found to root the Galaxy Note 10.1, my favorite tablet. Ideally, you’ll lose no information and really not notice much of a change to the OS, excluding a new app that manages root access. It’s also really quick (maybe 30 minutes at most).

However, one last time, I am pointing out that this can destroy everything, and is just here for your edification; I take no responsibility for you turning your Galaxy Note into a dinner tray.

The Tools

There are four pieces of software and two pieces of hardware that you’ll need for this.

Software:

  1. Windows – Sorry, but you’ll need to use Windows Vista or later (I haven’t tried on XP, so I have no idea, but I imagine it will work)
  2. Android 2.2 or later – Works all the way up to Jellybean 4.1 that I’ve tested.
  3. Samsung Kies – This is the software that you’ll need to set up your computer to modify the system files we’re going to be changing. [Download]
  4. CF-AutoRoot – The rooting software itself, just open this link in a tab and we’ll get back to what you need later. [Download]

Hardware:

  1. Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 – Your tablet, durh.
  2. Charging Cable – Has a 30-pin connector on one end and a USB on the other.

The Process

First of all, install Samsung Kies if you haven’t already. At the end of the install select the option that you don’t want to launch it (there’s no reason to, we’re not going to be directly using it) and to launch in Normal Mode. That’s all we’re doing with that.

This is what it should look like if you've done it right.

This is what it should look like if you’ve done it right.

On your tablet, open Settings and go to the “About Device” page, usually located at the bottom of the options. You can see your Android version here (make sure it falls in the range listed in tools) and the Model Number. It should be something like GT-N8xxx. Remember this model number.

Look at the page for the CF-AutoRoot forum that is listed above and find a link with your model number in the third post. It must EXACTLY match that number. Download that zip file and unpack it somewhere.

Now, on your tablet, hold in the Power Button and the Volume Down button for about 10 seconds. Your tablet will take a screenshot and then reboot. Keep holding down the buttons until you see a diagnostic screen with an Android symbol and the WARNING page which you should probably read. We’re reaching the point of no return. Click the Volume Up button to acknowledge that you understand the risks. You will see a “Downloading…” message.

This new app will be installed after reboot and will let you manage how apps get access to root.

This new app will be installed after reboot.

Plug the charging cable into the tablet and into a suitable USB port on your computer. Set the tablet aside and leave it alone.

Open the Odin-vxxxxx.exe as an administrator.* You should see a yellow box with COM1 or something like that in it. If not, reboot your computer and try again, starting from the beginning of this paragraph.

In Odin, click on the PDA button. Navigate to the folder where you unpacked Odin executable, select the .MD5 file (it should be the only option) and open it. Click the Start button.

After a few seconds the first box should turn green and say PASS. Once it does the tablet will reboot and your tablet is now rooted.

The Aftermath

Root Explorer App is a really powerful tool, especially for the price (free).

Root Explorer App is a really powerful tool, especially for the price (free).

This “autoroot” is the simplest of roots and keeps your tablet as close to stock (as Samsung released it) as possible. It gives you and apps superuser access and manages them through a new app called SuperSU. This is perfect if you’re looking to install some stuff that needs Superuser access or you want to go poking around yourself. However, this isn’t tailored for power users or those who want to supplant Android with another OS.

The first super-user required app that I send most people to is Root Browser on the Play Store. It’s a powerful file browser and it’s free. Be careful not to damage your system!

*If you don’t see the Odin executable, then you may need to get it separately. A stand-alone version of Odin can be found on the same forum attached to the second post. Just download it and extract it to the same folder as the MD5 and continue on.

-CJ Julius

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How I Got My Android Tablet to Boot Windows 95

24/05/2013

I was rummaging through some old software of mine a few weeks ago and taking stock of the old operating systems that I had commercially. I noticed that along with some older versions of Redhat and Ubuntu Server, I owned every version of Windows since 95, including quite a few server versions. I wondered what I could possibly do with them, since I don’t even use my store-bought copy of Windows XP anymore.

Hey, I remember you.

Hey, I remember you.

Then I looked at my new Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet and got an idea. I wondered if I could get Windows 95 to boot on it. So, I fired up Virtual Box and an old machine I had and got to work.

Note: I am using Ubuntu 12.04LTS and a Galaxy Note 10.1 to do this project. Also, I had access to another, older machine with which I could install Windows 95 myself. Your mileage may vary.

Build 95

There are a few ways to go about this. One is to use Virtual Box to create working Windows 95 VDI file and then convert that to an IMG after you’ve got it running and another is to just find a computer with Windows 95 and make an image of the drive. Either way you’ll have to do three things:

  1. Install DOS 5.x or better before installing Windows.
  2. Install Windows 95 and get it working.
  3. Make your image (.IMG) file.
Click to Enlarge

In Virtual Box, you’ll need to set up an MS-DOS environment first and then probably migrate to 95 later.

Now, I’ve tried both ways, and they’re both complex. In the first example, using Virtual Box to create a Windows 95 compatible area for the OS to work in is a pain. This is because the Windows 95 disk is not bootable (and neither is Windows 98 for that matter). You have to have DOS 5.x or later installed first and THEN go to Windows 95. This is as much work today as it was back in when Win95 came out.

Then, once you have Windows 95 running you need to get all the drivers (and you’ll probably have to use an older version of Virtual Box because of compatibility issues), some of them custom-made, install them, and squash bugs as they come up.

When you have everything set up Virtual-Box side, you can convert the VDI to an IMG file to make it usable with the vboxmanage command in termninal:

vboxmanage clonehd Win95.vdi Win95.img --format RAW

This is not the method I recommend, as it is the hardest even with a walk-through, however it may be the easiest for people with limited access to hardware. I had, luckily, a piece of hardware that would run Win95 with minimal effort so I went that route.

First, I put I installed MS-DOS 5.0.7 (available legally and for free here) from some image files to actual real-live 720KB disks. Yes, I still have a few of those. Then I set up my CD-ROM*, no small feat, and began the Windows 95 install.

Once this had been done, I pulled the HDD out of the computer and connected it to an IDE slot in another machine. I then used the dd command to make a raw image file of the newly-added drive. This ended up giving me a large file because I had given a Gig of space to the virtual drive so I’d have lots of space to move around. You could probably get away with only 200 or 300 MB if you wanted to do so. In any case, the command to image the drive was:

dd if=/where/drive/is/mounted/ of=where/you/want/image/ bs=4K

Now I had my Windows 95 image and it was time to get it running on the tablet!

Install 95

There are multiple ways to get Windows to run on your tablet once you have an image you like. I personally went through my version and pulled out all the things I didn’t want so I could create a smaller image. I eventually got the entire thing down to 200MB, but that was with a lot of work. There are also two ways to get the image running on your tablet. There’s the way I did it initially, and then the easy way. I’ll be showing the easy way and then give a brief overview of the more difficult path.

The Easy Way

You’re also going to want to use something like AirDroid, which I’ve reviewed before, to move the files over because chances are you’re going to be doing this a lot. As you make tweaks or move different things back and forth that GUI is going to come in real handy.

Click to Enlarge

After you put in the image location and name, it will need to copy it to the SDLlib’s directory, probably on your internal memory.

Move your image file over to your device and take note of its location. You’ll probably want to write it down or something, make sure you note the CASE of the letters, because that will be very important. Also you’ll need to make sure you have enough space to copy the image over to the working directory of the emulator that we’re going to use here in a minute. So you’ll need at least twice the space of the original IMG file to use it.

Go to the Play Store and find Motioncoding’s Emulator. It looks like an Android with the Windows XP flag colors on it. Download, install and run it.

Once running, go through the menus (using the forward/back buttons, it really couldn’t be more simple) until it asks you to install libSDL and do so. Then select the option under “Import from Library” to Add Custom Images. Name the image whatever you want and put in the path to the image in there. For example, mine is:

/storage/extSdCard/SDL/Win95.img

Select the image from My Images and continue to the end. You should see your OS boot.

The Hard Way

The reason I’m putting the hard way on here is because it gives you a bit more control over your install and, I think at least, runs a bit faster. In any case I’m going to assume that you’re doing it this way because you’re a little more experienced/curious and don’t need me to hold your hand.

Click to Enlarge

Copying over the SDL apk and related software.

Step one is getting a working version of the SDL apk and installing it. You can do a quick Google search for it, but I’m not sure of the legal ramifications (or its copyright) so I’m not putting a direct link here. Keep in mind that you will need to allow “Apps from Unknown Sources” to be installed on your device. This can usually be found in the “Application Settings” area, depending on your version of Android.

Place your Win95 image in the SDL folder with the APK and rename it c.img, and load SDLlib. You may have to do more tweaking at this point as Networking didn’t work out-of-the-box for me. I needed to modify some already existing .bin and .inf files to coax them into doing what I needed to do, and even then it’s a little haphazard. You’ll need to have some method of editing the img file if you can’t get networking going or you’re going to need to re-image the drive every time you want to make a change.

This way you’ll also have access to the BIOS and VGABIOS bin files, if needed, but I didn’t end up touching them.

Android 95

My reasons for doing this were purely academic. I just wanted to see if I could get it to boot and get it usable. After several weeks of poking at it I was, by all of the above methods, able to get 95 and 98 going this way. Windows 98 was just a matter of upgrading 95 and creating a new image file. I can’t think of many reasons to do this other than for the learning experience, though there are lots of pieces of software out there that don’t work so well in modern versions of Windows and maybe you want to take them with you.

Click to Enlarge

Windows 95 successfully running on my Galaxy Note 10.1 with mouse and keyboard support

Also, I was able to get my Logitech keyboard/mouse combo to work through the 30-pin charging port, and while dragging the cursor across the screen and “clicking” by tap was interesting, the keyboard is the way to go. It’s just too cumbersome for daily use otherwise.

So there it is, an Android tablet booting Windows 95/98! You can supposedly do this with Windows 2000 or XP, but I have not tried. If you have let me know, because I’d be interested in how you got native NTFS to work.

*There’s no instruction here because it really depends on your CD-ROM as to how you’d go about this. You’ll have to find one that will work with Win95 and DOS. I had one in the machine already so it was just a matter of setting it up manually through DOS.

-CJ Julius

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AirDroid: Android File Transfer Made Easy

06/05/2013
In Direct Connect Mode, you don't need to log in and only get access to the "lite" features.

In Direct Connect Mode, you don’t need to log in and only get access to the “lite” features.

I have a bad time with MicroSD memory cards. Seriously, I have destroyed two of them in the past six months. I’d like to think that it’s because of a manufacturing defect, but I’m pretty sure it’s just my inherent clumsiness.

See, my tablet, a Galaxy Note 10.1 uses this type of storage and I spend a lot of time moving things to and from it. It’s usually large files or huge blocks of small files so it takes quite a lot of time unless I put the card itself into an adaptorĀ  and plug it into my computer. Even the USB linking ability through the port on the tablet is painfully slow and sometimes just plain doesn’t work.

Emailing the files was sometimes the solution, but was impractical for larger files. Some times I could transfer through a USB stick, but that too was cumbersome. A few programs existed that allowed transfer between a computer and the device over Wifi, but most of them were lacking in some key respect, or didn’t function as I needed. Then I found AirDroid.

AirDroid is not exactly new to the scene, and in fact when I actually broke down and started searching for a solution to my problem, it was the first one to pop up. So I grabbed the “light” version and was throwing things to and from my tablet within minutes. All you need to do is grant it superuser permissions (so it can read/write/get updates) and sign up for the service (if you want to use the optional web version).

The GUI is very nice looking and offers a wide range of to

The GUI is very nice looking and offers a wide range of tools.

The app has two ways of connecting to your tablet, both of which involve configuring your tablet to act as a kind of file server. The first of these is to directly connect to your tablet over your current Wifi by pointing your browser to a specific IP and port (usually [Local IP Here]:8888). Then, through the gorgeous GUI, you can add/remove files, contacts, ringtones (if it’s an Android phone of course) as well as just about anything else that resides on your device.

The second way is similar to the first, except that you go through the AirDroid website (web.airdroid.com) to transfer files. This is useful if your tablet/phone is at home and you need to get something off of it. Assuming that your AirDroid app is running and connected, you can grab your files from literally anywhere in the world. There is a 1GB transfer limit on this function if you’re using the free version, though. So keep that in mind if you’re trying to pull a movie or something from your device.

If you want to grab an entire directory, you can get everything as one .ZIP file

If you want to grab an entire directory, you can get everything as one .ZIP file

Both of these look identical, in that the web interface is the same for both. The GUI has a multitasking feature, letting you add/remove files at the same time while checking your notifications and anything else you have the bandwidth for, as well as stats on your device like its battery life and storage capacity.

AirDroid did not crash or hang the entire time I used it no matter how much stress I put it under. I was transferring several Gigabytes of files to and from it while poking around in my contacts and looking at photos. Also, I run my tablet through an SSL VPN and didn’t have any troubles from that setup either.

On the whole this is a brilliant piece of software and an absolute must-have for any Android user who moves a lot of data around their mobile devices, which is probably everyone. AirDroid2 should be coming soon to my device and I am definitely looking forward to that.

Rating: 5/5 – Absolutely Perfect. You need this app.

-CJ Julius

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My Life After Google Reader

08/04/2013
Google Reader on PC

Farewell, Old Friend

I’ve used Google Reader for quite a while, probably five years or so. I wasn’t an early adopter, but the service had definitely become the cornerstone of how I interact with news from around the internet. It allowed me to take all of the different websites that I enjoyed and pull them into one feed, organized that feed and then share what I found interesting. It was a solid platform.

But it’s going away. As of July 1st, 2013, Google Reader will shut down and we’ll all be left to find another service to organized our RSS feeds.

I decided to start a few weeks ago, looking at other newsreaders that would offer a similar experience, or maybe even one better. I neededĀ  four things from my new software:

  1. It needed to work on Linux PC, iOS and Android, as I use all three OS types on a daily basis.
  2. It needed to be able to organize my feeds into groups that I had become familiar with over the years of using Google. This includes being able to save something for reading later.
  3. It needed to have integration into various sharing apps. Specifically, I needed to be able to get to Twitter, Linkedin and Buffer if possible. Maybe even WordPress if I could at all manage it.
  4. It needed to sync my reading lists over all of these platforms and preferably pull my data from Google.

    Feedly on Firefox in Linux

    Feedly on Firefox in Linux (Ubuntu 12.04)

It seemed like a fairly standard list, but I was not very optimistic. This is a tall order from a free (or cheap) newsreader, especially number 4 above.

I’ll cut to the chase here, since I’m sure that my step-by-step decision process is less than enthralling. I tried multiple different online readers, even the MSN one, and found them all pretty lacking. Some were good at organizing, but just had an iOS app or only worked on the computer. Others, Pulse for example, looked slick but didn’t offer much in the way of sharing options. I then came across this article on TechCrunch (via my news feeds on Google Reader, ironically) talking about a new relaunch of a piece of newsreader software called Feedly.

Feedly on iOS

Feedly on iOS (iPhone 4)

I’d heard of Feedly before, but I’d never investigated it beyond a few screenshots. Besides, I already had a newsreader that worked pretty darn well. After some reading I found that it was indeed the software I was looking for. It claimed to do all the things I wanted and then some.

So, I installed the app on all of my devices, synced them with my Google Reader account. All of my data came over flawlessly and I’ll admit it looked great. The sharing options were there with Buffer and Twitter integrated in already*. With minimal work on my part I was grabbing, commenting and sharing like a pro again.

As of this writing I’ve only been using a Feedly for about a day and a half, but I’m liking it (dare I say it?) more than Google Reader. There are a few bugs, and some configuration options that I wish were there, but it’s rare that I go out looking for a piece of software and find one that matches what I needed so perfectly. If you’re one of the immigrants from Google Reader and you need a news reader, I recommend Feedly extremely highly.

Feedly Android

Feedly on Android (Galaxy Note 10.1)

Ratings:
PC version: 4/5
iOS version: 5/5
Android version: 4/5

*Buffer does not seem to show up on my Android device. I don’t know if they have yet to implement it or if it’s a configuration thing. Probably the former as Android apps tend to lag a bit behind the iOS ones.

-CJ Julius