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The Easiest Way to Root a Galaxy Note 10.1

27/05/2013
Unlocking your Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (Proceed with Caution)

Proceed with Caution

Rooting your device is a pretty dangerous game, even nowadays when it’s almost commonplace. You can lose your data, void your warranty or even brick your device. However, if you’re looking to really unlock the power of your Android tablet, there’s really no better way. It gives you unparalleled access to your files, ability to install apps that do some pretty amazing things, or even install your own OS aside from Android.

So, obvious warnings aside (above), I want to show you the easiest way I’ve found to root the Galaxy Note 10.1, my favorite tablet. Ideally, you’ll lose no information and really not notice much of a change to the OS, excluding a new app that manages root access. It’s also really quick (maybe 30 minutes at most).

However, one last time, I am pointing out that this can destroy everything, and is just here for your edification; I take no responsibility for you turning your Galaxy Note into a dinner tray.

The Tools

There are four pieces of software and two pieces of hardware that you’ll need for this.

Software:

  1. Windows – Sorry, but you’ll need to use Windows Vista or later (I haven’t tried on XP, so I have no idea, but I imagine it will work)
  2. Android 2.2 or later – Works all the way up to Jellybean 4.1 that I’ve tested.
  3. Samsung Kies – This is the software that you’ll need to set up your computer to modify the system files we’re going to be changing. [Download]
  4. CF-AutoRoot – The rooting software itself, just open this link in a tab and we’ll get back to what you need later. [Download]

Hardware:

  1. Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 – Your tablet, durh.
  2. Charging Cable – Has a 30-pin connector on one end and a USB on the other.

The Process

First of all, install Samsung Kies if you haven’t already. At the end of the install select the option that you don’t want to launch it (there’s no reason to, we’re not going to be directly using it) and to launch in Normal Mode. That’s all we’re doing with that.

This is what it should look like if you've done it right.

This is what it should look like if you’ve done it right.

On your tablet, open Settings and go to the “About Device” page, usually located at the bottom of the options. You can see your Android version here (make sure it falls in the range listed in tools) and the Model Number. It should be something like GT-N8xxx. Remember this model number.

Look at the page for the CF-AutoRoot forum that is listed above and find a link with your model number in the third post. It must EXACTLY match that number. Download that zip file and unpack it somewhere.

Now, on your tablet, hold in the Power Button and the Volume Down button for about 10 seconds. Your tablet will take a screenshot and then reboot. Keep holding down the buttons until you see a diagnostic screen with an Android symbol and the WARNING page which you should probably read. We’re reaching the point of no return. Click the Volume Up button to acknowledge that you understand the risks. You will see a “Downloading…” message.

This new app will be installed after reboot and will let you manage how apps get access to root.

This new app will be installed after reboot.

Plug the charging cable into the tablet and into a suitable USB port on your computer. Set the tablet aside and leave it alone.

Open the Odin-vxxxxx.exe as an administrator.* You should see a yellow box with COM1 or something like that in it. If not, reboot your computer and try again, starting from the beginning of this paragraph.

In Odin, click on the PDA button. Navigate to the folder where you unpacked Odin executable, select the .MD5 file (it should be the only option) and open it. Click the Start button.

After a few seconds the first box should turn green and say PASS. Once it does the tablet will reboot and your tablet is now rooted.

The Aftermath

Root Explorer App is a really powerful tool, especially for the price (free).

Root Explorer App is a really powerful tool, especially for the price (free).

This “autoroot” is the simplest of roots and keeps your tablet as close to stock (as Samsung released it) as possible. It gives you and apps superuser access and manages them through a new app called SuperSU. This is perfect if you’re looking to install some stuff that needs Superuser access or you want to go poking around yourself. However, this isn’t tailored for power users or those who want to supplant Android with another OS.

The first super-user required app that I send most people to is Root Browser on the Play Store. It’s a powerful file browser and it’s free. Be careful not to damage your system!

*If you don’t see the Odin executable, then you may need to get it separately. A stand-alone version of Odin can be found on the same forum attached to the second post. Just download it and extract it to the same folder as the MD5 and continue on.

-CJ Julius

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4 comments

  1. Not long ago i came across your article and still have been reading along. I must express my admiration of the writing skill and chance to make readers read in the first place to the end. I must read newer posts and to share my thoughts to you.


  2. what if I do all that and my box doesn’t turn green?
    It didn’t and I’m sitting here stuck.


    • What box didn’t turn green?


  3. Saved aѕ a favorite, ӏ гeally like your website!



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