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Using Python 3 on Ubuntu 12.04

14/05/2013
Python on Linux

Python on Linux

Recently, I’ve turned my attention to Python, the programming language. I had some work with it in the past, but never really gotten that far. As a hobby, it was time consuming and other things got in the way. Now that I’ve freed up a small chunk of time every week I’ve decided to devote that to working on learning the new Python 3, since 2.x is going away eventually.

I quickly found out that Python 3 is not directly supported on my platform of choice: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. So, I needed to get this running from scratch, which involves downloading, compiling and making it easy to get to for working in.

Compiling and Installing

If you haven’t done so already, you’ll need to get a C compiler for Ubuntu. In general, it’s good to keep this resident on your machine anyway, since you don’t always know when you’ll need it and it doesn’t take up a whole lot of space.

sudo apt-get install build-essential

Then, we’ll need to get our Python installer from the web. I’m currently pointing towards the 3.3.1 version, but there will always be newer versions on the horizon, so check the download page.

wget http://www.python.org/ftp/python/3.3.1/Python-3.3.1.tar.bz2

This will download and the bzip tarball of the source code from the python website. Then, we need to un-ball it and change to the newly created directory.

tar jxf ./Python-3.3.1.tar.bz2
cd ./Python-3.3.1

Lastly, we’ll configure the source code, tell it where to install and then point our compiler (the first thing we did) at Python and tell it to put it all together.

./configure --prefix=/opt/python3.3
make && sudo make install

And now the basic Python core is ready to go. You can test it by putting the following in the command line.

/opt/python3.3/bin/python3

You should get the following output, or something quite similar:

Python 3.3.1 (default, May 12 2013, 22:10:01)
[GCC 4.6.3] on linux
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>>

Getting Fancy

A command line-type of person may want to create a symbolic link that will let them have a sort of “python command”. Keep in mind that in the following code, you can substitute the “/bin/python” for anything you want the command to be (ie. “/bin/py” or “/bin/pthn” which will make the command py or pthn respectively).

mkdir ~/bin
ln -s /opt/python3.3/bin/python ~/bin/python

Alternatively, you may want to install a virtual environment for testing or whatnot. To do this and activate it, use this in the command line.

/opt/python3.3/bin/pyvenv ~/py33
source ~/py33/bin/activate

Integrated Development Environments

If you’re anything like me, then coding directly from gedit or the like is cumbersome and not really all that fun. I like options, a GUI and all the bells and whistles, so I went looking for a an IDE.

KomodoEdit install is as simple as downloading it and running the install.sh

KomodoEdit’s install is as simple as downloading it and running the install.sh

Netbeans was the first choice, as I’d used that before for PHP work. Here, I wanted something more dedicated to Python. If you do decide to go this route, make sure that you get the one from the Netbeans website and install it yourself. The version in the Ubuntu Software Center is terribly out of date and judging from the reviews, fatally flawed.

My second choice was KomodoEdit, the stripped down version of the Komodo IDE which I’ve heard some good things about (but never used). You can get it for both x86 and x64 as an AS package from their website.

If you have another IDE that you like better, let me know and I’ll take a look at it. I’m always on the hunt for a better/easier way to code.

-CJ Julius

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2 comments

  1. […] Technology Of All Kinds « Using Python 3 on Ubuntu 12.04 […]


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