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Teaching Windows 8 and Ubuntu Linux to Share

08/05/2013
Rinder500 being shared on Zero.

Rinder500 being shared on Zero.

A few weeks ago, I had put together a project to turn a few eSATA drives that I had lying around into a few mobile digital vaults. This was a complete success, and gave me a bunch more room to do future projects. However, it did not give me an easy way to access these drives, especially the one attached to my main Windows machine and my laptop. Having to unplug/replug every time was proving cumbersome.

So, I decided to make my “mobile” drives a little more permanent, and then just give access to them across a system of three computers via wireless. This would give me 750GB between the machines with which to divvy up as I saw fit.

I’ll be approaching this in three parts:

  1. Setting up the 500GB on the Windows 8 machine (Zero) and sharing.
  2. Setting up the 250GB on my Ubuntu File Server (Crusher) and sharing.
  3. Connecting a Laptop (Stewart) and Zero and Crusher.

In my scenario I did not need to share to my file server from my Windows 8 machine. There’s no reason for it to access it, if successful, from anything other than Zero or Stewart.

Zero Trouble

The Rinder 250 share as viewed from the Windows 8 machine (Zero)

The Network as viewed from the Windows 8 machine (Zero)

So, step one was getting my shares running on Zero. The first thing I did was make sure my networking was all in line. Prior to this, I’d only ever used the Windows 8 computer to connect to the internet, never as part of any network. It had been part of another network previously, but not since the OS was upgraded.

In System Properties> Network ID I set it up as part of a Home Computer and gave it the Workgroup “ZRO_WG”. This is so I have an easy way of recognizing this machine on the network uniquely. Then, I simply shared the Rinder500 drive and set it to require a password.

Even though on Windows 8 your login is an email address, you’re only concerned with the username of the account. So if your account is SomeGuy@Somewhere.com then your user name is most likely going to be just “SomeGuy”. In my advanced sharing options (right-click, Advanced Sharing) I put a comment on the share to easily identify it, required a password and a simple name “rinder500”.

And that was it.

Doing Samba

Rinder250 shared on Linux

Rinder250 shared on Linux

In Ubuntu it was almost just as easy. I’m currently running Ubuntu 10.04 Server LTS on my file server, because I’m trying to stay away from Unity as long as I can*, and that’s what was around when I first put this machine together. That should also give you an idea of its age. Keep this in mind as I proceed as some of my methods may not work for new versions or the problems I had may not even be an issue anymore.

You can Share a drive on Ubuntu just like you would share any folder, since that’s how they’re treated when mounted. You do this by heading into the drive, in my case /media/Rinder250 and right-click to share. Then, I used the shares-admin command from terminal and added the users I wanted and verified that my shares had been added properly.

Shares-admin shows all the users and your shares.

Shares-admin shows all the users and your shares.

Your Workgroup defaults to your machine name, so it was Crusher for the file server. I used a local user (me) as someone with full rights to the share, just to keep it simple. But, you can use this method to add any number of users to the share and give them different permissions if you want.

To do any of this however, you will need to install Samba. You will be prompted for it when you try to share, so this isn’t an issue, unless your server isn’t connected to the internet for whatever reason.

Building the Intranet

Now that I had both of the shares created, it was time to link all of them together. I had three machines that I wanted to link together: Zero, Stewart and Crusher. All three had different OS’s and different needs so I’m detailing them individually.

Laptop's (Stewart) view of the network.

Laptop’s (Stewart) view of the network.

Zero

Zero is the Windows 8 machine and sharing the 500GB eSATA drive. The only one that it needed to link to was Crusher. I scanned the network (by doing the cumbersome task of clicking on the Network) and selecting Crusher.local. Then I put in my username and password for the share and Viola! everything was able to be read from and written to.

Crusher

Crusher is the Ubuntu 10.04 Server sharing the 250GB eSata drive. This got complicated, mostly because of the way Samba (on 10.04 at least) handles Windows shares. You can’t just find the share in the network, double click on it and be good. You have to manually type in the address and then fill out the user/pass information. Using the Go > Location menu and then putting in something like:

smb://WORKGROUP;username@ip.address.of.server/share/

Note the case of the case of the words, as they are important. The workgroup has to be in upper case and the username and share need to be in lower case. If it isn’t put in exactly as you see here, then it won’t work.

Stewart

Stewart shared nothing, but needed to access both shares on Crusher and Zero using Ubuntu 12.04. This one was finished just like Ubuntu 10.04 machine, except that I had to put in two shares. Also, instead of an IP for Crusher I was able to put in just crusher.local. Other than that, exactly the same.

In Production

On the two Ubuntu machines I ended up making bookmarks for them, so I could easily get to them without having to type in that long address every time. If I reboot the server, which is rarely, and I don’t have a static IP assigned, I will need to add the share again and bookmark it again.

Now that I have put together these shared drives, I can move or save things to them across the network. I will be using these network drives in the future, when I will attempt to digitize my movie library.

*As mentioned, I do have 12.04 on my laptop, Stewart.

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3 comments

  1. […] That’s what I did a few weeks ago, with an old computer (Crusher) that I’ve been using as a file server. Now it’s pulling double duty as a constantly-streaming video service that broadcasts over […]


  2. […] I put it on my Linux laptop (Stu) and a Windows 8 desktop (Zer0), both of which I’ve used in previous projects. It works, but it has a few caveats as you’ll see […]


  3. […] I put it on my Linux laptop (Stu) and a Windows 8 desktop (Zer0), both of which I’ve used in previous projects. It works, but it has a few caveats as you’ll see […]



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